My Blog
By Michael E. Huguet DDS
October 07, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  
WhatYouShouldKnowAboutaHomeTeethWhiteningKit

A relatively easy and inexpensive way to improve your smile is to whiten your teeth. In fact, you may even be able to do it yourself at home. Although there are differences between at-home and professional whitening, the former can still be effective.

That effectiveness, though, might be dependent on how well you understand what home whitening can do and what it can’t. So before you purchase your kit, here are a few things to know about DIY teeth whitening.

Home kits are safe—when used as directed. Although nothing in life is completely risk-free, home whitening kits are relatively safe. But only if you follow the directions: If you overuse the bleaching solution beyond its intended use, you could wind up with permanent damage to your tooth enamel that can be costly to treat.

Bleaching solutions are relatively mild. Nearly all home kits use carbamide peroxide, a form of hydrogen peroxide, as their bleaching agent. Home kits usually contain no more than 10% of this agent, much lower than professional solutions. Used as directed, this amount of bleaching agent poses little to no risk to dental or general health. On the other hand, the weaker home kit solution does limit the extent of brightness you can achieve compared to stronger professional treatments.

For top results (or certain conditions), consider professional whitening. While you can obtain good results with a home whitening kit, professional whitening provides more precise brightness control and range, and may possibly last longer. That’s because your dentist has more advanced techniques and equipment, as well as stronger bleaching solutions. And, if your discoloration originates inside your teeth, a home kit won’t help—only a dentist can address that kind of discoloration.

Even if you decide to “go solo,” your dentist can still give you advice on what to look for in a home kit, as well as tips for the actual procedure. But whether you whiten at home or let your dentist do it, teeth whitening can take years off your smile and give you a more attractive look.

If you would like more information on teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Whitening Safety Tips: Are Bleaching Products Safe?

SteelyDanFoundersDeathHighlightsImportanceofEarlyCancerDetection

Fans of the legendary rock band Steely Dan received some sad news a few months ago: Co-founder Walter Becker died unexpectedly at the age of 67. The cause of his death was an aggressive form of esophageal cancer. This disease, which is related to oral cancer, may not get as much attention as some others. Yet Becker's name is the latest addition to the list of well-known people whose lives it has cut short—including actor Humphrey Bogart, writer Christopher Hitchens, and TV personality Richard Dawson.

As its name implies, esophageal cancer affects the esophagus: the long, hollow tube that joins the throat to the stomach. Solid and liquid foods taken into the mouth pass through this tube on their way through the digestive system. Worldwide, it is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths.

Like oral cancer, esophageal cancer generally does not produce obvious symptoms in its early stages. As a result, by the time these diseases are discovered, both types of cancer are most often in their later stages, and often prove difficult to treat successfully. Another similarity is that dentists can play an important role in oral and esophageal cancer detection.

Many people see dentists more often than any other health care professionals—at recommended twice-yearly checkups, for example. During routine examinations, we check the mouth, tongue, neck and throat for possible signs of oral cancer. These may include lumps, swellings, discolorations, and other abnormalities—which, fortunately, are most often harmless. Other symptoms, including persistent coughing or hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, and unexplained weight loss, are common to both oral and esophageal cancer. Chest pain, worsening heartburn or indigestion and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can also alert us to the possibility of esophageal cancer.

Cancer may be a scary subject—but early detection and treatment can offer many people the best possible outcome.┬áIf you have questions about oral or esophageal cancer, call our office or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
September 17, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
NotallDentalCrownsSharetheSameQualityofLife-Likeness

Dental crowns are an essential means for restoring damaged or unattractive teeth. A well-crafted crown not only functions well, it looks and blends seamlessly with the rest of the natural teeth.

Crowns are artificial caps that cover an entire visible tooth, often used for heavily decayed or damaged teeth or as added protection after a root canal treatment. Most crowns are produced by a dental lab, but some dentists are now creating them in-office with computer-based milling equipment. On the whole, the various crowns now available function adequately as teeth—but they can vary in their appearance quality.

In the early to mid 20th Century the all-metal crown was the standard; but while durable, it could be less than eye-pleasing. Although more life-like dental porcelain existed at the time, it tended to be brittle and could easily shatter under chewing stress.

Dentists then developed a crown that combined the strength of metal with the attractiveness of porcelain: the porcelain fused to metal or PFM crown. The PFM crown had a hollow, metal substructure that was cemented over the tooth. To this metal base was fused an outer shell of porcelain that gave the crown an attractive finish.

The PFM reigned as the most widely used crown until the mid 2000s. By then improved forms of porcelain reinforced with stronger materials like Lucite had made possible an all-ceramic crown. They’re now the most common crown used today, beautifully life-like yet durable without the need for a metal base.

All-ceramics may be the most common type of crown installed today, but past favorites’ metal and PFM are still available and sometimes used. So depending on the type and location of the tooth and your own expectations, there’s a right crown for you.

However, not all crowns even among all-ceramic have the same level of aesthetic quality or cost—the more life-like, the more expensive. If you have dental insurance, your plan’s benefits might be based on a utilitarian but less attractive crown. You may have to pay more out of pocket for the crown you and your dentist believe is best for you.

Whatever you choose, though, your modern dental crown will do an admirable, functional job. And it can certainly improve your natural tooth’s appearance.

If you would like more information on dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
September 07, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers  

Dental VeneersDental veneers beautify smiles spoiled by cosmetic defects. If your teeth and gums are healthy, but you feel less than confident when you smile, veneers may solve the problem. At Michael E. Huguet DDS and Associates in Pleasant Hill, CA, you and your cosmetic dentist may use these ceramic laminates as part of a makeover suited to your individual goals.

The story of porcelain veneers

They've been around for decades, but because of modern diagnostic and treatment techniques, porcelain veneers have risen in popularity over the past 35 years. Custom-made from high-grade porcelain according to oral impressions and three-dimensional imaging, veneers disguise the front sides of teeth right in what dentists name "the smile zone"--in other words, the teeth which show when you laugh or smile.

What defects do veneers disguise? As a stand-alone cosmetic treatment or as part of a comprehensive makeover, dental veneers cover problems such as:

  • Hairline cracks
  • Large chips
  • Dark, intractable stains which do not lighten with professional teeth whitening
  • Overcrowded teeth
  • Gapped teeth
  • Teeth malformed during their development (peg-shaped lateral incisors are common ones)
  • Teeth that are too short or uneven in length

To qualify for veneers, you and your dentist will discuss your aesthetic goals at his Pleasant Hill, CA, office. He or she will examine your mouth to make sure your oral health is good, and if all is well, the doctor will take oral impressions.

These negative imprints help the dental lab construct a three-dimensional model of your mouth and to create each veneer with the perfect size and configuration. Veneers are realistically color-matched to your surrounding teeth, too, so photographs often accompany the treatment plan.

Veneers are permanent

Minor dental resurfacing is part of the process. Your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of enamel from each tooth. This allows your veneers to function within your mouth and makes the bonding process secure. Note that once you decide on veneers, you will always wear veneers as your teeth are permanently altered.

Placing veneers

Your dentist uses a tooth-colored bonding cement to place your veneers. The cement color may be varied to create a lifelike look which blends in with your other teeth. As a final step, the dentist hardens the cement with a blue curing light, ensuring the veneers stay put.

Caring for them

The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry says that on average veneers last for about ten years, although some people make them last up to 20 years. Key to longevity and attractiveness are:

  • Brushing twice daily
  • Flossing daily
  • Getting semi-annual cleanings and check-ups with your dentist
  • Avoiding hard foods such as taffy or candy apples
  • Using a bite guard at night if you grind your teeth
  • Limiting foods which stain (soda pop, blueberries)
  • Avoiding tobacco

Find out more

If porcelain veneers intrigue you, contact your cosmetic dentists at Michael F. Huguet DDS & Associates in Pleasant Hill, CA, for a consultation. This professional team keeps teeth and gums healthy and enhances the beauty of smiles for people of all ages. Call today at (925) 945-6204.

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
September 07, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Oral Hygiene   oral health  
KeepUpGoodDentalHabitsinCollegetoProtectYourTeethandGums

Starting college is one of life’s biggest transition moments, the first time many young people can truly say they’re on their own. Their freshman year can be both exhilarating and frightening.

The reason for this seeming dichotomy is that both exciting opportunities and harmful pitfalls abound in college life. One such pitfall that’s often overlooked involves dental health: it’s all too easy to neglect good habits and adopt bad ones. But while it may not seem as harmful as other dangers, inattention to your dental health could create consequences that plague you long after graduation.

But being diligent about dental care can help you avoid serious problems now and in the future. At the top of the list: brush and floss your teeth daily and continue seeing a dentist at least twice a year. Hopefully, your parents or guardians have trained you in these vital habits—and they’re definitely habits you should continue for the rest of your life.

Close in importance to good oral hygiene is a healthy diet. Besides eating primarily “natural” food—fresh fruits and vegetables and less-processed foods—you should also set limits on your sugar consumption. This carbohydrate is a primary food for disease-causing bacteria, so limiting as much as possible the sugar you eat to just meal times will lower your risk for tooth decay.

Another area in which you should tread wisely is alcohol consumption. Besides the obvious consequences of alcohol abuse, immoderate drinking can also cause dental problems. Alcohol (and smoking) tends to dry out the mouth, which can increase the levels of oral bacteria and in turn increase your risk of both tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease.

Finally, avoid getting piercings involving the lips, mouth or tongue even if it’s the thing to do. Piercing hardware can chip teeth and contribute to the shrinking back of the gums (recession). And be sure you practice safe sex: unprotected sexual activity could expose you to viral infections that cause oral problems including cancer.

Your college years should be an exciting and memorable experience. By practicing these and other common sense dental habits, you’ll be sure to remember these years fondly.

If you would like more information on dental care during college, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Health Tips for College Students.”





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