My Blog
By Michael E. Huguet DDS
May 27, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures

Your Cosmetic Dentistry Options

If your teeth are discolored, misaligned or some of them are chipped or cracked, cosmetic dentistry can upgrade your smile. A dental makeover can improve the way you look and the way you feel. Your cosmetic dentist will work with you to design a treatment plan to suit your needs. Dr. Michael E. Huguet is a cosmetic dentist in Pleasant Hill, CA. You can call him to discuss your cosmetic dentistry options.

Types of Cosmetic Dentistry

When it comes to cosmetic dentistry, you have several options depending on the condition of your teeth and the type of changes you wish to make.

Teeth Whitening

Professional whitening is one of the most popular and simplest ways to improve your teeth. It also gives you better results than an over-the-counter kit. If you still prefer to whiten your teeth at home, you can purchase a bleaching kit from your dentist.

Dental Bonding

For this procedure, a durable plastic resin is molded to a tooth and hardened with a laser, which bonds the resin to the tooth. Dental bonding can be used to correct chipped, cracked, or decayed teeth. It can also be used to replace amalgam fillings.

Dental Veneers

Veneers are very thin shells, made from porcelain or resin, that fit over the front surface of your existing teeth. They can be used to hide chips, cracks, stains, or misshapen teeth. Each veneer is bonded to the underlying tooth, so it is secure. They can be designed to match your natural teeth.

Dental Implants

Pleasant Hill residents who have lost one or more teeth can replace them with dental implants. The implant is comprised of a titanium post that is implanted into the bone to replace the root of the missing tooth. As the jawbone grows around the post, it keeps it secured. A replacement tooth is attached to the post, leaving you with a natural-looking smile.

Dental Crowns

Also known as dental caps, crowns are fitted over a damaged or decayed tooth to restore its shape, size, appearance, and strength. Crowns prevent weakened teeth from cracking or breaking off. They can be made from metal alloys, porcelain or resin.

If you would like to find out more about cosmetic dentistry, call Dr. Huguet at his Pleasant Hill practice on (925) 945-6204.

WhatTaraLipinskiDoestoProtectOneofHerMostValuableAssets-HerSmile

Tara Lipinski loves to smile. And for good reason: The Olympic-gold medalist has enjoyed a spectacular career in ladies' figure skating. Besides also winning gold in the U.S. Nationals and the Grand Prix Final, in 1997 Lipinski became the youngest skater ever to win a World Figure Skating title. Now a sports commentator and television producer, Lipinski still loves to show her smile—and counts it as one of her most important assets. She also knows the importance of protecting her smile with daily hygiene habits and regular dental care.

Our teeth endure a lot over our lifetime. Tough as they are, though, they're still vulnerable to disease, trauma and the effects of aging. To protect them, it's essential that we brush and floss every day to remove bacterial plaque—that thin accumulating film on teeth most responsible for tooth decay and gum disease.

To keep her smile in top shape and reduce her chances of dental disease, Lipinski flosses and brushes daily, the latter at least twice a day. She also uses a tongue scraper, a small handheld device about the size of a toothbrush, to remove odor-causing bacteria and debris from the tongue.

Lipinski is also diligent about visiting the dentist for professional cleanings and checkups at least twice a year because even a dedicated brusher and flosser like her can still miss dental plaque that can then harden into tartar. Dental hygienists have the training and tools to clear away any lingering plaque and tartar that could increase your disease risk. It's also a good time for the dentist to check your teeth and gums for any developing problems.

The high pressure world of competitive figure skating and now her media career may also have contributed to another threat to Lipinski's smile: a teeth-grinding habit. Teeth grinding is the unconscious action—often while asleep—of clenching the jaws together and producing abnormally high biting forces. Often a result of chronic stress, teeth grinding can accelerate tooth wear and damage the gum ligaments attached to teeth. To help minimize these effects, Lipinski's dentist created a custom mouthguard to wear at night. The slick plastic surface of the guard prevents the teeth from generating any damaging biting forces when they clench together.

The importance of an attractive smile isn't unique to celebrities and media stars like Tara Lipinski. A great smile breeds confidence for anyone—and it can enhance your career, family and social relationships. Protect this invaluable asset with daily oral hygiene, regular dental visits and prompt treatment for disease or trauma.

If you would like more information about protecting your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Decay” and “Teeth Grinding.”

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
May 09, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
WhatReallyHappensDuringaRootCanalTreatment

Bad news at your last dental visit: You have a decayed tooth. And not just in the enamel—the decay has invaded the tooth's inner pulp and the resulting infection is threatening the supporting bone structure.

You're thinking that tooth is toast. Then comes the good news: your dentist believes the tooth can be rescued with a root canal treatment.

But then you begin thinking about how often Uncle Sid says he'd rather undergo a colonoscopy than have a root canal. Is the procedure really as painful and uncomfortable as popular culture says it is? What is a root canal really like?

First step: Things go numb. Uncle Sid is wrong: A root canal treatment is painless because your dentist will first make sure the entire area involving the tooth is anesthetized. This does involve injecting the local anesthetic deep within the tissues, but you won't even feel the needle prick thanks to topical anesthesia applied to the surface gums.

Second step: Drilling deep. After applying a protective dam to isolate the infected tooth from its neighbors, your dentist will drill a small access hole through the enamel and dentin to reach the pulp and root canals. If it's one of the larger back teeth, the access hole is usually drilled in the tooth's biting surface; in a front tooth, the hole is usually located on the tongue side.

Third Step: Removing diseased tissue. Using special instruments, your dentist will remove the diseased tissue in the pulp and root canals, essentially stopping the infection and any tooth pain you've been experiencing. The empty pulp chamber and canals are often then disinfected with a special antibacterial solution.

Fourth Step: Protecting the tooth. After some shaping, the pulp chamber and root canals are filled with a special filling to prevent further infection. The access hole is then filled and sealed to complete the procedure. At some point in the future, the tooth typically will need a crown to add support and further protection.

You may have some minor discomfort afterward, but this can usually be managed with a mild pain reliever like ibuprofen or acetaminophen. After a week or so, you'll be good as new—and so will your tooth.

If you would like more information on root canal therapy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
April 29, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: pediatric dentistry   x-rays  
SafetyisaPriorityWhenImagingChildrensTeethwithX-Rays

X-ray imaging is a routine part of a child's dental care — and it undeniably makes a difference in preventing and treating dental disease. It's so routine, we can easily forget they're being exposed to an invisible form of electromagnetic radiation.  And just like other sources of radiation, too much x-ray exposure could increase the risk of cancer.

But while it's possible for your child to be over-exposed to x-rays, it's highly unlikely. That's because healthcare professionals like dentists adhere to a standard known as ALARA when considering and administering x-rays. ALARA is an acronym for “as low as reasonably achievable.” In other words, we only want to expose a patient to the lowest and safest levels of x-ray dosage and frequency that will achieve the most benefit.

To achieve that standard, professional dental organizations advocate the use of x-rays only after a clinical examination of the patient, as well as a thorough review of their medical history for any usage of x-rays for other conditions. If x-rays are warranted, we then take further precautions to protect the patient and staff, and only use the type of x-ray application that's absolutely necessary. For most children that will be a set of two or four bitewing radiographs, which are quite effective for detecting decay in back teeth.

This dosage of radiation in a session of bitewing radiographs is roughly a fifth of the background radiation in the environment a child may be exposed to every day. By spacing these sessions at least six months apart, we're able to achieve a high level of decay detection at a safe and reasonable amount of x-ray exposure.

On top of that, the digital advances in x-ray imaging have reduced the amount of radiation energy needed to achieve the same results as we once did with film. These lower exposure levels and the ALARA standard helps ensure your child's exposure to x-rays will be well within safe limits.

If you would like more information on the use of x-rays with children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “X-Ray Safety for Children.”

By Michael E. Huguet DDS
April 27, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Oral Hygiene  

Oral health care protects teeth against cavities, bacteria, gum disease, and tooth loss. Dr. Michael Huguet of Pleasant Hill, CA, helps his patients understand the importance of proper oral hygiene.

What does a good oral regimen consist of?

  1. Routine visits to your dentist ensure early detection of diseases, such as cancer and gum disease. This allows for early intervention so that diseases don't spread to other tissues. During a routine checkup, which should happen twice a year, the dentist uses x-rays to locate any cavities, and a dental hygienist performs a dental cleaning.
     
  2. A professional dental cleaning is when a hygienist first uses a small mirror to find any inflammation around the teeth and gum tissue because of plaque and tartar buildup. During this appointment, your hygienist removes the plaque and tartar using a tool called a scaler, which is essential for deep cleaning under the gumline. Water is also run over teeth to wash away debris and your hygienist polishes your teeth.
     
  3. Brushing and flossing daily are just as important as the previous points. Brush twice a day using a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride-containing mouthwash and toothpaste. Fluoride prevents cavities and reverses damage done by cavities. Flossing at least once before bed decreases bacterial growth between teeth and under the gumline. If you have questions about proper brushing and flossing, you can visit your Pleasant Hill dentist for a thorough crash course on the best dental care methods.

What about those pesky stains?

One of the many advantages of visiting Dr. Huguet is that he's a cosmetic dentist. What does a cosmetic dentist have to do with oral care? Well, after you've brushed, flossed, and professionally cleaned your teeth, you may notice some stubborn stains. Those are usually because of age, too much coffee/tea, and/or aging, among other reasons. A cosmetic dentist uses teeth whitening procedures to eliminate those stains so you have cleaner whiter teeth.

If you'd like to learn more about proper dental care and how to have a brighter smile, call your Pleasant Hill, CA, cosmetic dentist, Dr. Michael Huguet, at (925) 945-6204.





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